Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care

Stay at AICD

Your attending physician will inform you in detail how your postoperative period and your stay at AICD is expected to go. The length of stay at the department varies depending on the type and extent of the surgical intervention.

Preliminary preparation

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Stay at the Department

The premises of the Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Department are near the Operating Theatre Unit and the Maternity Unit of Nadezhda and after Caesarean section and other surgical interventions, varying in complexity and scope, some patients spend a certain period of time in them for monitoring of their general condition or for intensive care.

Your attending physician will inform you in detail how your postoperative period and your stay at AICD is expected to go. Depending on the specific surgical intervention and at the discretion of the anaesthesiologist and your attending physician, at the AICD you may be allowed water intake and you will be advised to bring a stack of 500 ml bottles of water with you to the hospital upon admission.

 

The use of mobile phones is allowed at AICD, in case such use is not disturbing the peace and quiet atmosphere for other patients in the department.

 

If you are on ongoing medication therapy in relation to any comorbidities, you must bring your prescription book with you on admission to hospital and make this known to the physician, who will visit you for an anaesthetic consultation prior to surgery.

 

No food or liquids other than water may be brought into AICD. At the discretion of the anaesthesiologist and your attending physician, you may be allowed to take hospital food that is appropriate to your surgical intervention and dietary regimen appropriate to your condition.

The length of stay at the department varies depending on the type and extent of the surgical intervention and is at the discretion of your attending physician, obstetrician or surgeon, and anaesthesiologist.

  • For laparoscopic (bloodless) operations, the stay is usually 3 to 6 hours.
  • For open abdominal operations and Caesarean sections – a minimum of 24 hours.
  • For normal labour and after intravenous anaesthesia, without complications, 2 to 4 hours.

The administration of different types of anaesthesia during surgical interventions may cause some transient side effects, which in the postoperative period resolve by themselves or are managed by intravenous infusions.

After endotracheal (general anaesthesia) and intravenous anaesthesia, it is normal to feel dizzy and lightheaded. The degree of dizziness is determined by the duration of anaesthesia, the severity of the surgical intervention, and the individual characteristics of each patient.

IMPORTANT! If you are going to undergo an intervention of one-day surgery type requiring anaesthesia, please note that it is not advisable to drive or perform any activities involving a high level of concentration and responsibility on the same day

Your relatives may obtain information about you from your attending physician if you expressly request it. Please note that visiting is not allowed at AICD.

Anaesthetic consultation for elective surgeries

If you are due to undergo abdominal surgery, laparoscopy or elective caesarean section, you will undergo a mandatory anaesthetic consultation on the day of admission to hospital. Be sure to inform the anaesthesiologist of any allergies and current medication intake, as well as any existing comorbidities.

Before undergoing any intervention under anaesthesia, you will have the opportunity to obtain informed consent regarding placement under anaesthesia and the possible complications and side effects associated with it.

When is a preliminary consultation with an anaesthesiologist necessary?

  • If you have had a case of allergic reaction to anaesthesia in the past. In such cases, the anaesthesiologist may recommend pre-testing for anaesthetics.
  • If you have experienced allergic shock. In such cases, the anaesthesiologist may recommend pre-testing for anaesthetics.
  • If you suffer from systemic chronic diseases and especially those requiring ongoing supportive therapy.
  • If you have suffered any serious complications in previous anaesthetic interventions.
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See also

Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care
Anaesthesia during childbirth
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