medical oncology

Immunotherapy

One of the reasons cancer cells develop is that they have the ability to protect themselves from the immune system. Certain types of immunotherapy can mark cancer cells so that they become recognizable to the immune system, which then more easily detects and destroys them.

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Certain types of immunotherapy can mark cancer cells so that they become recognizable to the immune system, which then more easily detects and destroys them. Another type of immunotherapy stimulates a person’s built-in anti-tumor immunity to work more actively against cancer cells.

 

The immune system functions through certain points that resemble checkpoints. At these points, the immunological response is suppressed when it is too strong. An immunotherapy subtype (checkpoint inhibitors) blocks these checkpoints, which results in a particular “release” of Т-cells (a type of whie blood cells), which can destroy cancer cells. These drugs do not target the tumor directly. Instead, they prevent the tumor from evading the body’s immunological response.

 

See also

Clinical trials
Chemotherapy
Targeted therapy
Stay at the Clinic
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